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2005 Atlantic hurricane season

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season unexpectedly became the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions.

The impact of the season was widespread and ruinous with at least 2,048 deaths and record damages of over $100 billion USD.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "2005 Atlantic hurricane season", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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