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Aerial photography

Aerial photography is the taking of photographs from above with a camera mounted, or hand held, on an aircraft, helicopter, balloon, rocket, kite, skydiver or similar vehicle.

It was first practiced by the French photographer and balloonist Nadar in 1858.

The use of aerial photography for military purposes was expanded during World War I by aviators.

Aerial photography is used in cartography, land-use planning, archaeology, movie production, environmental studies, espionage, commercial advertising, conveyancing, and other fields.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Aerial photography", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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