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Antiretroviral drug

Antiretroviral drugs are medications for the treatment of infection by retroviruses, primarily HIV.

Different classes of antiretroviral drugs act at different stages of the HIV life cycle.

Combination of several (typically three or four) antiretroviral drugs is known as Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART).

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Antiretroviral drug", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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