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Atlantic sturgeon

The Atlantic sturgeon is a member of the Acipenseridae family and is among one of the oldest fish species in the world.

Its range extends from New Brunswick, Canada to the eastern coast of Florida.

It was in great abundance when the first settlers came to America, but has since declined due to overfishing and water pollution.

It is considered threatened, endangered and even extinct in much of its original habitats.

The fish can reach sixty years of age, fifteen feet in length and over eight hundred pounds in weight.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Atlantic sturgeon", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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