Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Brain tumor

A brain tumor is any intracranial mass created by an abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells either normally found in the brain itself: neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors).

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Brain tumor", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-07-28 at 9:50 am EDT

Lighting Up Brain Tumors

Lighting Up Brain Tumors

Ivanhoe (Sep. 12, 2013) One major problem surgeons face when trying to remove a brain tumor is not being able to find all of the tumor, to remove it. Now, doctors are able to light up the tumor and see them better than ever before.
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Painting' Keaton's Tumor

'Painting' Keaton's Tumor

Ivanhoe (Dec. 13, 2013) Removing a brain tumor is one of the most challenging procedures a surgeon can perform. Now a new paint helps highlight exactly where the tumor is, giving patients a better chance at a full recovery.
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Human Brain Map Points Way to Future Discovery

3D Human Brain Map Points Way to Future Discovery

Reuters (July 16, 2013) German and Canadian scientists have built a three dimensional map of the human brain to help in the development of new treatments for neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The "human brain map" shows the organ in unprecedented detail, allowing neuro-researchers to examine brain function and pathways on a molecular level. Rob Muir reports.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Exercise Keeps Older Brains in Shape

Exercise Keeps Older Brains in Shape

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 4, 2013) A healthy brain just keeps getting better with age. That is the surprising discovery of Ernst Poeppel, a brain researcher in Munich. Vocabulary, verbal memory and spacial and associative reasoning reach peak performance between the ages of 40 and 56. Ernst Poeppel says young and old brains show very little difference. So there's no reason they can't function optimally a whole life long - provided they're kept in shape like muscles. They can even grow new brain cells. The neuro-networks and transmitters, on the other hand, can get a bit rusty with age.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins