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Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases in which cells are aggressive (grow and divide without respect to normal limits), invasive (invade and destroy adjacent tissues), and/or metastatic (spread to other locations in the body).

These three malignant properties of cancers differentiate them from benign tumors, which are self-limited in their growth and do not invade or metastasize (although some benign tumor types are capable of becoming malignant).

Cancer may affect people at all ages, even fetuses, but risk for the more common varieties tends to increase with age.

Cancer causes about 13% of all deaths.

Apart from people, forms of cancer may affect animals and plants.

Nearly all cancers are caused by abnormalities in the genetic material of the transformed cells.

These abnormalities may be due to the effects of carcinogens, such as tobacco smoke, radiation, chemicals, or infectious agents.

Other cancer-promoting genetic abnormalities may be randomly acquired through errors in DNA replication, or are inherited, and thus present in all cells from birth.

Complex interactions between carcinogens and the host genome may explain why only some develop cancer after exposure to a known carcinogen.

New aspects of the genetics of cancer pathogenesis, such as DNA methylation, and microRNAs are increasingly being recognized as important.

Genetic abnormalities found in cancer typically affect two general classes of genes.

Cancer-promoting oncogenes are often activated in cancer cells, giving those cells new properties, such as hyperactive growth and division, protection against programmed cell death, loss of respect for normal tissue boundaries, and the ability to become established in diverse tissue environments.

Tumor suppressor genes are often inactivated in cancer cells, resulting in the loss of normal functions in those cells, such as accurate DNA replication, control over the cell cycle, orientation and adhesion within tissues, and interaction with protective cells of the immune system.

Cancer is usually classified according to the tissue from which the cancerous cells originate, as well as the normal cell type they most resemble.

These are location and histology, respectively.

A definitive diagnosis usually requires the histologic examination of a tissue biopsy specimen by a pathologist, although the initial indication of malignancy can be symptoms or radiographic imaging abnormalities.

Most cancers can be treated and some cured, depending on the specific type, location, and stage.

Once diagnosed, cancer is usually treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

As research develops, treatments are becoming more specific for different varieties of cancer.

There has been significant progress in the development of targeted therapy drugs that act specifically on detectable molecular abnormalities in certain tumors, and which minimize damage to normal cells.

The prognosis of cancer patients is most influenced by the type of cancer, as well as the stage, or extent of the disease.

In addition, histologic grading and the presence of specific molecular markers can also be useful in establishing prognosis, as well as in determining individual treatments.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Cancer", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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