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Caribbean Monk Seal

The Caribbean Monk Seal, the only seal ever known to be native to the Caribbean sea and the Gulf of Mexico, is now considered extinct.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Caribbean Monk Seal", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-10-24 at 11:35 pm EDT

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