Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chemical synapse

Chemical synapses are specialized junctions through which cells of the nervous system signal to one another and to non-neuronal cells such as muscles or glands.

A chemical synapse between a motor neuron and a muscle cell is called a neuromuscular junction.

Chemical synapses allow the neurons of the central nervous system to form interconnected neural circuits.

They are thus crucial to the biological computations that underlie perception and thought.

They also provide the means through which the nervous system connects to and controls the other systems of the body.

The human brain contains a huge number of chemical synapses, with young children having about 10,000 trillion synapses.

This number declines with age, stabilizing by adulthood.

Estimates for an adult vary from 1,000 to 5,000 trillion synapses.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Chemical synapse", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-04-16 at 7:40 am EDT

New Fertilizer Revolutionizes French Agriculture

New Fertilizer Revolutionizes French Agriculture

AFP (Apr. 30, 2012) A new, organic fertilizer created in France’s Averyon region utilises a specially developed strain of fungus to speed up organic decomposition without any of the harmful side-effects of chemical fertilizer. Already in use by 5000 of France’s 350,000 farmers and becoming a hot item on the international market, it just may step up to challenge the global dominance of chemical fertilizers.
Powered by NewsLook.com
EU Bans Three Bee Harming Pesticides for Two Years

EU Bans Three Bee Harming Pesticides for Two Years

France 24 (Apr. 30, 2013) Environmentalists hailed a "victory for bees" on Monday after the European Union voted for a ban on several nerve-agent pesticides blamed for the dramatic decline in global bee populations. Fifteen of the 27 member states, including France, voted for a two-year restriction on the neonicotinoids, despite strong opposition from chemical companies.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chemicals on Crops Pesticides Causing Controversy

Chemicals on Crops Pesticides Causing Controversy

Deutsche Welle (July 16, 2013) The use of pesticide and herbicide sprays is routine in Germany. From fighting weeds to fungus and insects, Bayer Crop Science has a suitable chemical agent. But nobody wants those chemicals in their food, and there are many critics who warn of risks. Kerstin Schweizer met proponents and critics.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 11, 2013) With flying cameras and three-dimensional nuclear spin imaging Ulrich Schurr is studying the growth of energy crops. Rapeseed, sugar beets, China grass - these are plants which can be easily processed to give fuel and raw materials for the chemical industry. But how well, how fast and how uniformly will these plants grow in a northern German climate? The plant scientist from the Jlich Research Center is convinced that energy crops will play a big role in the future - as long as their cultivation does not compete with food crop production. To what extent that is possible - that is being investigated by a newly founded research center: the Bioeconomy Science Center.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins