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Commercial fishing

Commercial fishing is the activity of catching fish and other seafood for commercial profit, mostly from wild fisheries.

It provides a large quantity of food to many countries around the world, but those who practice it as an industry must often pursue fish far into the ocean under adverse conditions.

Large-scale commercial fishing is also known as industrial fishing.

This profession has gained in popularity with the development of shows such as Deadliest Catch, Swords, and Wicked Tuna.

The major fishing industries are not only owned by major corporations but by small families as well.

The industry has had to adapt through the years in order to keep earning a profit.

A study taken on some small family-owned commercial fishing companies showed that they adapted to continue to earn a living but not necessarily make a large profit.

It is the adaptability of the fishermen and their methods that cause some concern for fishery managers and researchers; they say that for those reasons, the sustainability of the marine ecosystems could be in danger of being ruined.

Commercial fishermen harvest a wide variety of animals, ranging from tuna, cod, carp, and salmon to shrimp, krill, lobster, clams, squid, and crab, in various fisheries for these species.

There are large and important fisheries worldwide for various species of fish, mollusks, crustaceans, and echinoderms.

However, a very small number of species support the majority of the world's fisheries.

Some of these species are herring, cod, anchovy, tuna, flounder, mullet, squid, shrimp, salmon, crab, lobster, oyster and scallops.

All except these last four provided a worldwide catch of well over a million tonnes in 1999, with herring and sardines together providing a catch of over 22 million metric tons in 1999.

Many other species are fished in smaller numbers.

The industry, in 2006, also managed to generate over 185 billion dollars in sales and also provide over two million jobs in the United States, according to an economic report released by NOAA's Fisheries Service.

Commercial fishing may offer an abundance of jobs, but the pay varies from boat to boat, season to season.

Crab fisherman Cade Smith was quoted in an article by Business Week as saying, "There was always a top boat where the crew members raked in $50,000 during the three- to five-day king crab season--or $100,000 for the longer snow crab season."

That may be true, but there are also the boats who don't do well;

Smith said later in the same article that his worst season left him with a loss of 500 dollars.

A 2009 paper in Science estimates, for the first time, the total world fish biomass as somewhere between 0.8 and 2.0 billion tonnes.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Commercial fishing", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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