Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Computer worm

A computer worm is a self-replicating computer program.

It uses a network to send copies of itself to other nodes (computer terminals on the network) and it may do so without any user intervention.

Unlike a virus, it does not need to attach itself to an existing program.

Worms always harm the network (if only by consuming bandwidth), whereas viruses always infect or corrupt files on a targeted computer.

Worms mainly spread by exploiting vulnerabilities in operating systems, or by tricking users to assist them.

Anti-virus and anti-spyware software are helpful, but must be kept up-to-date with new pattern files at least every few days.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Computer worm", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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