Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Construction

In project architecture and civil engineering, construction is the building or assembly of any infrastructure on a site or sites.

Although this may be thought of as a single activity, in fact construction is a feat of multitasking.

Normally the job is managed by the construction manager, supervised by the project manager, design engineer or project architect.

While these people work in offices, every construction project requires a large number of laborers, carpenters, and other skilled tradesmen to complete the physical task of construction.

For the successful execution of a project effective planning is essential.

Those involved with the design and execution of the infrastructure in question must consider the environmental impact of the job, the successful scheduling, budgeting, site safety, availability of materials, logistics, inconvenience to the public caused by construction delays, preparing tender documents, etc.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Construction", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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