Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Coriolis effect

The Coriolis effect caused by the rotation of the Earth is responsible for the precession of a Foucault pendulum and for the direction of rotation of cyclones.

In general, the effect deflects objects moving along the surface of the Earth to the right in the Northern hemisphere and to the left in the Southern hemisphere.

As a consequence, winds around the center of a cyclone rotate counterclockwise on the northern hemisphere and clockwise on the southern hemisphere.

However, contrary to popular belief, the Coriolis effect is not a determining factor in the rotation of water in toilets or bathtubs.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Coriolis effect", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-04-24 at 1:29 am EDT

Whatever Happened to the Hole in the Ozone Layer?

Whatever Happened to the Hole in the Ozone Layer?

Deutsche Welle (May 27, 2013) — The damage caused by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) came to light in the 1980s when scientists discovered a huge hole in the ozone layer. Since the ban on CFCs came into effect, the ozone layer has been recovering, but only very slowly. CFCs released from aerosol cans, refrigerators and air conditioning systems continue to damage layers of the stratosphere decades after their release.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Using Comics to Save the Planet

Using Comics to Save the Planet

Deutsche Welle (Sep. 23, 2013) — Sebastian Jenal, better known as zi, is a cartoonist and environmental activist. He's initiated the "Bonn Climate Ambassador" program to get young children interested in protecting the environment. His comics are printed in a school magazine that's distributed to primary schools across Bonn. It them, his heroes explain what the Greenhouse Effect and climate protection are all about. And each year hundreds of the western German city's students become proud owners of what's known as a "climate license".
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hydropower on the Mekong: Progress or Folly?

Hydropower on the Mekong: Progress or Folly?

Deutsche Welle (June 3, 2013) — The Mekong River is the lifeblood of some 60 million people. It provides the conditions necessary for rice cultivation and a rich supply of freshwater fish. But Laos has identified its potential as a provider of energy. The country wants to become the "powerhouse" of Southeast Asia and is planning to build six hydropower plants on the river. But environmentalists and neighboring countries object to the plans, fearing the ecological consequences of the project, as well as the effect on the people living by the river. The Mekong River is home to some 700 species of fish, whose downriver passage will be disrupted by the construction of the dams. Critics say both the fishing and the tourist industries will suffer as a result of the project.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Studio Guest: Dr. Brigitte Knopf, Climate Scientist

Studio Guest: Dr. Brigitte Knopf, Climate Scientist

Deutsche Welle (Sep. 11, 2011) — Dr. Brigitte Knopf works for the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. She focuses on energy systems and their effect on the climate.DW-TV: Welcome to the program. Scientists from the Max-Plack-Institute suggest that wind energy is limited. What's your take on that?Brigitte Knopf: First of all it's fully correct that there is in principal a physical limit on the wind potential. But it's not relevant for energy supply for the whole world. So it's not relevant for today or for 2050 or even 2100. So nothing to worry about at the moment?Not that much, no.Would you agree that solar power is the renewable that has the most potential at the moment?At the moment yes, it has a big technical potential. But you also have to consider the costs and you have to compare the different technologies and what is less expensive.Most worldwide energy needs at the moment are still being met by carbon fuels: oil, natural gas, coal. Renewables now only cover 13% of energy needs. Only a tiny fraction
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins