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Cricket (insect)

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera).

They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae.

Crickets are known for their chirp (which only male crickets can do; male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" instrument).

They chirp by rubbing their wings or legs over each other, and the song is species-specific.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Cricket (insect)", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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