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Dead Sea scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls comprise roughly 600 documents, including texts from the Hebrew Bible, discovered between 1947 and 1956 in eleven caves in and around the Wadi Qumran (near the ruins of the ancient settlement of Khirbet Qumran, on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea).

The texts are of great religious and historical significance, as they are practically the only remaining Biblical documents dating from before AD 100.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Dead Sea scrolls", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2015-04-21 at 11:14 am EDT

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