Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Distributed generation

Distributed generation is a new trend in the generation of heat and electrical power.

The concept permits the "consumer", who is generating heat or electricity for their own needs, to send their surplus electrical power back into the power grid or share excess heat via a distributed heating grid.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Distributed generation", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-11-26 at 11:26 pm EST

Aerial Engineers Seek Inspiration From Slo Mo Hummingbirds

Aerial Engineers Seek Inspiration From Slo Mo Hummingbirds

Reuters (Oct. 1, 2013) Researchers at Stanford University are looking to one of nature's most agile creatures - the hummingbird - for design tips as they build the next generation of aerial search and rescue vehicles. Using high-speed cameras, the engineers are slowing down time to study the birds in flight. Ben Gruber reports.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mechanical Carp Takes Marine Robotics to New Depths

Mechanical Carp Takes Marine Robotics to New Depths

Reuters (Oct. 21, 2013) The next generation of weapons for marine warfare may look and behave like fish. Scientists in Singapore are copying the natural movement of carp to develop a sea-going robot for use in stealth missions for the military, search and rescue operations or ocean floor research. Rob Muir reports.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blind Juggling Robots Bring Calm to Chaos

Blind Juggling Robots Bring Calm to Chaos

Reuters (Feb. 6, 2013) The brains controlling the next generation of interactive, walking robots may well come from a laboratory in Zurich, where scientists are testing new algorithms on juggling machines. With no sensory help in the form of cameras or microphones, the robots are able to keep balls in the air with nothing but mathematics to guide them.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tomorrow's Trains

Tomorrow's Trains

Deutsche Welle (Dec. 9, 2012) Researchers from nine different German Aerospace Center Institutes are working together to come up with the train of the future. The vehicle that they're planning will be able to travel at 400 kilometers per hour. It will also be safer and more environmentally friendly than current locomotives. The so-called Next Generation Train will be a doubledecker, without any staircases inside. First-class passengers will get into the first floor, and second-class passengers will board at ground floor level. Sensors will be used to couple the sections of the trains. In the event of a crash, the nose of the train will crumple and absorb the energy of the collision. The damaged element can then be easily replaced. Tomorrow's trains will be able to do all this and a lot more.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins