Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Doppler effect

The Doppler effect, named after Christian Andreas Doppler, is the apparent change in frequency or wavelength of a wave that is perceived by an observer moving relative to the source of the waves.

The siren on a passing emergency vehicle will start out higher than its stationary pitch, slide down as it passes, and continue lower than its stationary pitch as it recedes from the observer.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Doppler effect", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-08-29 at 10:21 pm EDT

Big Data Weather: Tracking Tornadoes Goes High Tech

Big Data Weather: Tracking Tornadoes Goes High Tech

FORA.tv (May 9, 2013) Kelvin Droegemeier's research involves the dynamics and predictability of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. He helped pioneer the science of storm-scale numerical weather forecasting, leading the early development of the world's first atmospheric computer model capable of assimilating Doppler radar and other data for explicitly predicting high-impact local weather such as individual thunderstorms. High performance computing has played a key role in Droegemeier's career as an educator and scientist, and during the past decade he helped establish two supercomputing centers at the University of Oklahoma and served on NSF's Blue Ribbon Panel on Cyberinfrastructure.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Physics Students a Maze With Leidenfrost Effect

Physics Students a Maze With Leidenfrost Effect

Reuters (Nov. 29, 2013) An aluminum maze which demonstrates the so-called 'Leidenfrost effect' could help inspire the development of a new wave of non-electric thermostats. In physics, the 'Leidenfrost effect" allows water droplets to travel upwards on heated surfaces, a phenomenon scientists in the UK believe could become the basis of new engineering systems. Jim Drury went to see it in action.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Looking at Your Friend's Food Pics Could Ruin Your Appetite

Looking at Your Friend's Food Pics Could Ruin Your Appetite

Newsy (Oct. 6, 2013) According to a new study, looking at your friend's food photos on social media can have an effect on what you crave.
Powered by NewsLook.com
NHK Sees New Angles for TV Sports

NHK Sees New Angles for TV Sports

Reuters (Oct. 15, 2013) A visual effect made famous in the blockbuster movie, "The Matrix", is being developed for TV sports coverage by Japanese broadcasting giant, NHK. Using multiple cameras and computer technology, the network is making time appear to stand still for a new perspective on sports action. Rob Muir reports.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins