Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Erosion

Erosion is the displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock and other particles) by the agents of wind, water or ice, by downward or down-slope movement in response to gravity or by living organisms (in the case of bioerosion).

Erosion is distinguished from weathering, which is the decomposition of rock and particles through processes where no movement is involved, although the two processes may be concurrent.

Erosion is an intrinsic natural process but in many places it is increased by human land use.

Poor land use practices include deforestation, overgrazing, unmanaged construction activity and road or trail building.

However, improved land use practices can limit erosion, using techniques like terrace-building and tree planting.

A certain amount of erosion is natural and, in fact, healthy for the ecosystem.

For example, gravels continually move downstream in watercourses.

Excessive erosion, however, can cause problems, such as receiving water sedimentation, ecosystem damage (including dead fish) and outright loss of soil.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Erosion", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-11-26 at 4:34 am EST

United Against Soil Erosion: German Farmers in Georgia

United Against Soil Erosion: German Farmers in Georgia

Deutsche Welle (Nov. 4, 2012) Less rainfall due to climate change and strong mountain winds are causing serious soil erosion in Georgia. The ongoing effects of overforestation and overgrazing during the Soviet era are exacerbating the problem. Even though Georgia's soil is richer in minerals than Germany's, soil erosion has reduced harvests there by up to 40 percent. Now German farmers are providing tips to their Georgian counterparts to help them slow down soil erosion.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shade Trees and Mangroves Climate Change in the South Pacific

Shade Trees and Mangroves Climate Change in the South Pacific

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 6, 2012) The Pacific island nation Vanuatu is running out of time. The indigenous inhabitants are already suffering from floods, cyclones, coastal erosion and water shortages. And climate researchers say the extreme weather will increase and sea levels will continue to rise. Most members of the indigenous population depend on natural resources from farming, forestry and fishing. Now climate change is endangering the livelihoods of the islands' inhabitants. Since 2009, Germany has been funding educational measures for politicians and journalists, and has kick-started several projects for the local rural population. On the main island, Efate, for example, new more robust vegetable varieties are being cultivated, as well as shade trees with nitrogen-fixing properties.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Climate: Philippines How the Fishing Industry Is Tackling Climate Change

Climate: Philippines How the Fishing Industry Is Tackling Climate Change

Deutsche Welle (Sep. 16, 2013) The Verde Island Passage in the northern Philippines is home to more documented species than any other marine habitat on earth. But this biodiversity is increasingly under threat from coastal erosion and rising water temperatures. The Conservation International (CI) environmental organization helps fishermen change their practices and thereby preserve fish stocks. During 'closed season', they can concentrate on alternative sources of income, such as tourism.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Farming Revolution in South Africa

Farming Revolution in South Africa

Deutsche Welle (Feb. 20, 2012) A new project in South Africa is taking organic waste that would otherwise be left to simply decay in garbage dumps and processing it in a special facility belonging to the South African company Reliance. There, it is converted it into microbiological compost. The project prevents some 100,000 tons of methane gas being emitted into the atmosphere each year. In addition, the compost helps to improve the quality of the soil, makes plants more robust and helps farmers cut down on the use of pesticides. It's also helping South Africa tackle one of its biggest problems: the massive use of chemical fertilizers in the country has made the ground infertile, caused soil erosion and led to contaminated water.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins