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Food groups

The food groups are part of a method of classification for the various foods that humans consume in their everyday lives, based on the nutritional properties of these types of foods and their location in a hierarchy of nutrition.

Eating certain amounts and proportions of foods from the different categories is recommended by most guides to healthy eating as one of the most important ways to achieve a healthy lifestyle through diet.

Different food guides vary in the number of categories used to divide types of food, but the majority of them include the following classifications: grain products; vegetables; fruits; dairy products; meat and alternatives; fats, oils and sugars.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Food groups", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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