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Gamma ray burst

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe known to the field of astronomy.

They consist of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours, the longer ones being followed by several days of X-ray afterglow.

These flashes occur at apparently random positions in the sky about once per day.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Gamma ray burst", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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