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Green Iguana

The green iguana (Iguana iguana) is a large, arboreal lizard from Central and South America.

The green iguana is found over a large geographic area, from Mexico to southern Brazil and Paraguay, as well as on the Caribbean Islands.

They are typically about two metres in length from head to tail and can weigh up to five kg.

It is possible to determine the sex of a green iguana by examining the underside of the hind legs.

Males have highly developed pores in this area that secrete scent, and are often covered in a waxy substance.

In addition, the spiny scales that run along an iguana's back are noticeably longer and thicker in males than they are in females.

These lizards have recently become extremely popular in the pet trade.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Green Iguana", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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