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High fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a newer and sweeter form of corn syrup.

Like ordinary corn syrup, it is made from corn starch using enzymes.

High fructose corn syrup is cited by some nutritionists as a leading cause of obesity and is linked to diabetes.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "High fructose corn syrup", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-10-24 at 9:23 am EDT

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