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Human migration

Human migration denotes any movement by humans from one locality to another, often over long distances or in large groups.

Humans are known to have extensively migrated throughout history.

This article concentrates on the historical human migrations.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Human migration", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-09-02 at 7:55 am EDT

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