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Lyme disease

Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis is an infectious tick-borne disease, caused by the Borrelia spirochete, a gram-negative microorganism.

Lyme disease is named after a cluster of cases that occurred in and around Old Lyme and Lyme, Connecticut in 1975.

Before 1975, elements of Borrelia infection were also known as "tick-borne meningopolyneuritis", Garin-Bujadoux syndrome, Bannwarth syndrome or sheep tick fever.

It is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Lyme disease", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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