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Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), formerly referred to as Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), is a method used to visualize the inside of living organisms as well as to detect the composition of geological structures.

It is primarily used to demonstrate pathological or other physiological alterations of living tissues and is a commonly used form of medical imaging.

MRI has also found many novel applications outside of the medical and biological fields such as rock permeability to hydrocarbons and certain non-destructive testing methods.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Magnetic resonance imaging", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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