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Materials science

Materials science is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering.

It includes elements of applied physics and chemistry, as well as chemical, mechanical, civil and electrical engineering.

With significant media attention to nanoscience and nanotechnology in the recent years, materials science has been propelled to the forefront at many universities, sometimes controversially.

In materials science, rather than haphazardly looking for and discovering materials and exploiting their properties, one instead aims to understand materials fundamentally so that new materials with the desired properties can be created.

The basis of all materials science involves relating the desired properties and relative performance of a material in a certain application to the structure of the atoms and phases in that material through characterization.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Materials science", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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