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Moment magnitude scale

The moment magnitude scale was introduced in 1979 by Tom Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori as a successor to the Richter scale and is used by seismologists to compare the energy released by earthquakes.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Moment magnitude scale", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-10-25 at 1:36 pm EDT

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The Netherlands: Shaken Up

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A Closer Look at Pakistan's Earthquake Island

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