Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pollution

Environmental pollution is the release of environmental contaminants, generally resulting from human activity.

Carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides produced by industry and motor vehicles are common air pollutants.

Arguably the principal source of air pollutants worldwide is motor vehicle emissions, although many other sources have been found to contribute to the ever growing problem.

Principal stationary pollution sources include chemical plants, coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, nuclear waste disposal activity, incinerators, large animal farms, PVC factories, metals production factories, plastics factories, and other heavy industry.

Pollutants can cause disease, including cancer, lupus, immune diseases, allergies, and asthma.

Adverse air quality can kill many organisms including humans.

Motor vehicle emissions are one of the leading causes of air pollution.

Principal stationary pollution sources include chemical plants, coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, petrochemical plants, nuclear waste disposal activity, incinerators, large livestock farms (dairy cows, pigs, poultry, etc.), PVC factories, metals production factories, plastics factories, and other heavy industry.

Some of the more common soil contaminants are chlorinated hydrocarbons (CFH), heavy metals (such as chromium, cadmium--found in rechargeable batteries, and lead -- found in lead paint, aviation fuel and still in some countries, gasoline), MTBE, zinc, arsenic and benzene.

Ordinary municipal landfills are the source of many chemical substances entering the soil environment (and often groundwater), emanating from the wide variety of refuse accepted, especially substances illegally discarded there, or from pre-1970 landfills that may have been subject to little control in the U.S. or EU.

Pollution can also be the consequence of a natural disaster.

For example, hurricanes often involve water contamination from sewage, and petrochemical spills from ruptured boats or automobiles.

Larger scale and environmental damage is not uncommon when coastal oil rigs or refineries are involved.

Some sources of pollution, such as nuclear power plants or oil tankers, can produce widespread and potentially hazardous releases when accidents occur.

Adverse air quality can kill many organisms including humans.

Ozone pollution can cause respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, throat inflammation, chest pain, and congestion.

Water pollution causes approximately 14,000 deaths per day, mostly due to contamination of drinking water by untreated sewage in developing countries.

Oil spills can cause skin irritations and rashes.

Noise pollution induces hearing loss, high blood pressure, stress, and sleep disturbance.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Pollution", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

See the following related content on ScienceDaily:


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-04-20 at 5:28 am EDT

Sao Paulo Choking on Its Own Smog: Study

Sao Paulo Choking on Its Own Smog: Study

Reuters (Oct. 21, 2013) Sao Paulo, host city of the first World Cup soccer match next year, has a major pollution problem. A recent study says air pollution in the southern Brazilian city causes three times more deaths than breast cancer or traffic accidents and costs the state US$160 million per year. Tara Cleary reports.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Paris Police Take Measures to Help Combat Pollution

Paris Police Take Measures to Help Combat Pollution

AFP (Mar. 13, 2014) Nearly a third of the 22 regions in mainland France are on a maximum pollution alert. Police in Paris have been trying to bring down pollution levels by diverting traffic from the city and enforcing lower speed restrictions. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Research Shows 55% of Southland Commuters Interested in Ridesharing, but Many Still Have Yet to Use Alternate Modes of Transportation

New Research Shows 55% of Southland Commuters Interested in Ridesharing, but Many Still Have Yet to Use Alternate Modes of Transportation

Business Wire (Oct. 7, 2013) New research conducted by the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) found 55% of Los Angeles area commuters are interested in ridesharing, however only 22% of commuters in the Southland currently rideshare or use alternative forms of transportation. As a result, the MSRC is reviving the Rideshare Thursday campaign to motivate drivers to get out of their individual cars and educate them on ridesharing options such as carpools, vanpools, bicyc
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tsunami Debris Adds to Pollution

Tsunami Debris Adds to Pollution

Xinhua News Agency (Aug. 9, 2012) The debris from last year's Japan tsunami has become a huge environmental problem, and has lead to an increase in the severity of ocean pollution.
Powered by NewsLook.com

Related Stories


Share This



Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins