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Recent single-origin hypothesis

The single-origin hypothesis (or Out-of-Africa model) is one of two accounts of the origin of anatomically modern humans, Homo sapiens.

Because of the scarcity of fossils and the discovery of important new finds every few years, researchers disagree about the details and sometimes even basic elements of human evolutionary history.

According to the single-origin model, every species of the genus Homo but one, Homo sapiens, was driven extinct.

This species had evolved in Eastern Africa between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago and, some time afterwards, in a relatively recent exodus, began colonizing the rest of the world.

According to the single-origin model, these more recent migrants did not interbreed with the scattered descendants of earlier exodi.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Recent single-origin hypothesis", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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