Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shrimp farm

A shrimp farm is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimp or prawns for human consumption.

Commercial shrimp farming began in the 1970s, and production grew steeply, particularly to match the market demands of the USA, Japan and Western Europe.

The total global production of farmed shrimp reached more than 1.6 million tonnes in 2003, representing a value of nearly 9,000 million U.S. dollars.

About 75% of farmed shrimp is produced in Asia, in particular in China and Thailand.

The other 25% is produced mainly in Latin America, where Brazil is the largest producer.

The largest exporting nation is Thailand.

Shrimp farming has changed from traditional, small-scale businesses in Southeast Asia into a global industry.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Shrimp farm", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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