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Silicon

Silicon is the chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Si and atomic number 14.

A tetravalent metalloid, silicon is less reactive than its chemical analog carbon.

It is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust, making up 25.7% of it by weight.

Silicon is a very useful element that is vital to many human industries.

Silicon is used frequently in manufacturing computer chips and related hardware.

Because silicon is an important element in semiconductor and high-tech devices, the high-tech region of Silicon Valley, California, is named after this element.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Silicon", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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