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Social effects of Hurricane Katrina

The impact and aftermath of Hurricane Katrina led to one of the most severe humanitarian crises in the history of the United States.

In addition to the over 1,300 fatalities caused by Katrina over the Southeast, there were thousands of people, and as many animals, who rode out Katrina and were left without clean water, food and shelter.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Social effects of Hurricane Katrina", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-10-01 at 3:00 pm EDT

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