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Spaying and neutering

Spaying and neutering are the respective surgical processes of female and male animal sterilization, to keep them from producing offspring.

Neutering is sometimes used to refer to the surgery in either males or females.

The process in males is also referred to as castration, or gelding.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Spaying and neutering", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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last updated on 2014-04-23 at 8:44 pm EDT

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