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Storm chasing

Storm chasing is broadly defined as the intentional pursuit of a thunderstorm, regardless of motive.

A person who storm chases is known as a storm chaser, or simply a chaser.

While witnessing a tornado is the biggest objective for most chasers, many delight in seeing cumulonimbus structure, watching a barrage of hail and lightning, and seeing what skyscapes unfold.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Storm chasing", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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