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Time in physics

In physics, the treatment of time is a central issue.

In physics, the treatment of time is a central issue.

It has been treated as a question of geometry.

One can measure time and treat it as a geometrical dimension, such as length, and perform mathematical operations on it.

It is a scalar quantity and, like length, mass, and charge, is usually listed in most physics books as a fundamental quantity.

Time can be combined mathematically with other fundamental quantities to derive other concepts such as motion, energy and fields.

Time is largely defined by its measurement in physics.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Time in physics", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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