Reference Article

from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Water resources

Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful to humans.

It is important because it is needed for life to exist.

Many uses of water include agricultural, industrial, household, recreational and environmental activities.

Virtually all of these human uses require fresh water.

Only 2.5% of water on the Earth is fresh water, and over two thirds of this is frozen in glaciers and polar ice caps.

Water demand already exceeds supply in many parts of the world, and many more areas are expected to experience this imbalance in the near future.

It is estimated that 70% of world-wide water use is for irrigation in agriculture.

Climate change will have significant impacts on water resources around the world because of the close connections between the climate and hydrologic cycle.

Due to the expanding human population competition for water is growing such that many of the worlds major aquifers are becoming depleted.

Many pollutants threaten water supplies, but the most widespread, especially in underdeveloped countries, is the discharge of raw sewage into natural waters.

Note: This article excerpts material from the Wikipedia article "Water resources", which is released under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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