Health & Medicine News
October 13, 2015

Latest Headlines
updated 1:10pm EDT

More Health & Medicine News
October 13, 2015

Bacterium That Causes Q Fever Linked to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Oct. 13, 2015 — The bacterium that causes Q fever, an infectious disease that humans contract from animals, is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma, according to a ... read more

Listeria Can Grow on Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples

Oct. 13, 2015 — Caramel apples punctured with dipping sticks and left unrefrigerated over the course of a couple of weeks may harbor a bacterium called Listeria monocytogenes, according to a ... read more

Social Media Content May Hold Keys to Important Health Information

Oct. 13, 2015 — Language used in everyday social media posts may have a strong connection to an individual’s health. In the first study of its kind, the new results suggest that not only are many adult Facebook ... read more

Novel Imaging Study Demonstrates How the 'Social Brain' Is Functionally Impaired in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Oct. 13, 2015 — Brain areas linked to social behaviors are both underdeveloped and insufficiently networked in youths with high functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to study participants without ASD, ... read more

Calcium Supplements May Increase the Risk of Kidney Stone Recurrence

Oct. 13, 2015 — Calcium supplements may increase the risk of kidney stone recurrence, according to a new ... read more

New Research Sees Zebrafish Earn Their Stripes in the Fight Against Muscular Dystrophy

Oct. 13, 2015 — New research has demonstrated a new method for observing the behavior of the protein Dystrophin in a living animal cell, in real-time. This breakthrough may provide a key to understanding how to ... read more

Cell Authentication Survey Shows Little Progress in a Decade

Oct. 12, 2015 — A new survey of almost 450 biomedical researchers from every major stakeholder group (e.g., academia, industry) shows little has changed in cell line authentication and culture practices in the past ... read more

Double Enzyme Hit May Explain Common Cancer Drug Side Effect

Oct. 12, 2015 — Many leukemias are caused by loss of the enzyme Pten. Some anti-leukemia treatments work by inhibiting another enzyme called Shp2. Researchers have now found that mice lacking both of these enzymes ... read more

Oct. 12, 2015 — Inhibiting infants' tongue movements impedes their ability to distinguish between speech sounds, researchers have found. The study is the first to discover a direct link between infants' ... read more

Researchers Use 'Avatar' Experiments to Get Leg Up on Locomotion

Oct. 12, 2015 — Results of a biomechanical study of leg motion could be used to create robotic devices to assist human locomotion, setting the stage for merging human and machine, say ... read more

RNA Editing Technique Treats Severe Form of Muscular Dystrophy

Oct. 12, 2015 — An RNA editing technique called 'exon skipping' has shown preliminary success in treating a rare and severe form of muscular dystrophy that currently has no treatment. The discovery stems ... read more

Oct. 12, 2015 — Conan Thompson becomes first baby to have a 3D printed model made of his face while still in the womb to help doctors determine whether he would need a lifesaving procedure at ... read more

Cardiac Patients Receive Comparable Care from Physicians, Advanced Practice Providers

Oct. 12, 2015 — Patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation receive comparable outpatient care from physicians and advanced practice providers -- physician assistants and nurse ... read more

Turncoat Protein Regulates Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells to Drug

Oct. 12, 2015 — A surprising, paradoxical relationship between a tumor suppressor molecule and an oncogene may be the key to explaining and working around how breast cancer tumor cells become desensitized to a ... read more

First Comprehensive Profile of Non-Protein-Coding RNAs in Human Cancers

Oct. 12, 2015 — 70 percent of the genome is made into non-coding RNA, but most studies of genomic alterations in cancer have focused on the miniscule portion of the human genome that encodes protein. An ... read more

Oct. 12, 2015 — Cancer researchers have discovered how cancer-induced bone destruction causes skeletal muscle weakness. They found that inhibiting TGF-?, a growth factor released from bone during cancer-induced bone ... read more

New Optoelectronic Probe Enables Communication With Neural Microcircuits

Oct. 12, 2015 — The burgeoning field of optogenetics makes it possible for scientists to control brain activity using pulses of light. Now, researchers have developed an optoelectronic device which opens the ... read more

Prostate Cells Undergo 'Reprogramming' to Form Tumors, Study Finds

Oct. 12, 2015 — Researchers link early prostate cancer to alterations in a program controlled by a 'master regulator' of cell growth. These epigenetic changes point to new avenues for preventing and ... read more

Elevated Blood-Sugar Levels in Pregnancy Tied to Baby's Heart-Defect Risk

Oct. 12, 2015 — Pregnant women with elevated blood-sugar levels are more likely to have babies with congenital heart defects, even if their blood sugar is below the cutoff for diabetes, according to a new ... read more

Study Examines Concussion-Like Symptom Reporting in Uninjured Athletes

Oct. 12, 2015 — Uninjured athletes reported concussion-like symptoms in a new study that suggests symptom reporting in the absence of recent concussion is related to male or female sex and preexisting conditions, ... read more

Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Monday, October 12, 2015
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Monday, October 12, 2015
Saturday, October 10, 2015
Friday, October 9, 2015
Thursday, October 8, 2015