Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Semen Can Worsen Cervical Cancer

Date:
September 4, 2006
Source:
University Of Edinburgh
Summary:
Researchers from the Medical Research Council's Human Reproductive Sciences Unit at The University of Edinburgh have found that that the high concentration of prostaglandin in semen makes other diseases of the female reproductive organs worse -- including uterine cancer.

Researchers from the Medical Research Council's Human Reproductive Sciences Unit at The University of Edinburgh have found that that the high concentration of prostaglandin in semen makes other diseases of the female reproductive organs worse -- including uterine cancer.

The team, led by Dr Henry Jabbour, an Honorary Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University, has found the prostaglandins present in semen can influence the progression of cervical and uterine cancers by enhancing tumour growth.

Prostaglandin is naturally produced by the cells that line the female reproductive organs. Its usual role is to help regulate cell growth. For example, messages passed on from cell to cell by prostaglandin molecules direct the womb lining to either thicken or shed in the monthly menstrual cycle.

However, the concentration of prostaglandin in seminal fluid is 1000 times higher than that normally found in these cells.

Prostaglandin receptor molecules are present on the surface of the cells that make up cervical and uterine cancer tumours. The influx of prostaglandin delivered by semen enhances the normal level of signalling between cells. The high volume starts new cascades of signals that eventually lead to an increase in tumour growth.

Cervical cancer is most common in women who live in the developing world. In the UK, screening programmes detect most abnormal cell changes in women before a tumour develops. Although prostaglandins do not cause cervical cancer (it is usually triggered by long--term human papilloma virus infection), this research shows that seminal fluid can contribute to tumour growth.

Dr Henry Jabbour said:

"Sexually active women who are at risk of cervical or uterine cancer should encourage their partners to wear a condom to prevent increased exposure to the prostaglandins that might make their condition worse.

"It also highlights the potential for a new therapeutic approach that will tackle both possible sources of prostaglandin, those produced naturally by women and those introduced to the body by sperm."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Edinburgh. "Semen Can Worsen Cervical Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060903151304.htm>.
University Of Edinburgh. (2006, September 4). Semen Can Worsen Cervical Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060903151304.htm
University Of Edinburgh. "Semen Can Worsen Cervical Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060903151304.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins