Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nonspecific marker of non-erosive reflux disease

Date:
March 30, 2010
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. However, diagnosis of NERD is not objective. A research group investigated esophageal mucosal damage in response to various factors, and revealed that acute stress and aspirin induced dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) in esophagus uncorrelated with acid reflux, suggesting that DIS is a nonspecific marker of NERD.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an important public health problem which is extremely common nowadays. Symptoms of GERD arise from the exposure of increased acid gastric contents into the lower part of the esophageal mucosa. Most patients with GERD have NERD with invisible mucosal damages under endoscopy. There is not a gold standard to diagnose NERD due to the poor sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of many existing methods. Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) in the esophageal epithelium have been a recent research hotspot.

DIS has been considered as a feature of esophageal epithelial damage induced by gastric acid reflux, and serves as a marker for new methods to diagnose NERD. Studies have highlighted the importance of refluxed gastric acid in esophageal epithelial DIS. Until now, the specificity of DIS has been questionable.

A research article to be published on March 7, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team, led by Professor Zhou from Peking University Third Hospital, used transmission electron microscopy to evaluate the esophageal mucosal damages in response to various factors in rats, including acute stress, hydrochloric acid, ethanol, aspirin, and prednisolone.

Five damaging factors produced no lesions or inflammation in esophageal mucosae of rats, whether under gross or routine histological inspections. Esophageal epithelial intercellular space diameters in stress and aspirin groups were significantly greater, nearly three or two-fold respectively, than those in their corresponding control groups. These findings indicate that acute stress and aspirin can induce DIS of the esophageal epithelium in rats, and DIS appears before changes that can be seen in gross and routine histological inspections. Further study showed no significant difference in the intercellular space diameters between the group pretreated with esomeprazole to inhibit gastric acid secretion and the control group, in both stress and aspirin models, suggesting that DIS induced by acute stress and aspirin is not correlated with acid reflux.

By showing that DIS is not related solely to acid reflux, this study suggests that DIS is an early and sensitive, but nonspecific, ultrastructural feature of NERD. These results are beneficial for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of NERD, and provide useful information for further study on the mechanism of this disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zhang et al. Factors influencing intercellular spaces in the rat esophageal epithelium. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2010; 16 (9): 1063 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v16.i9.1063

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Nonspecific marker of non-erosive reflux disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100330102743.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2010, March 30). Nonspecific marker of non-erosive reflux disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100330102743.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Nonspecific marker of non-erosive reflux disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100330102743.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins