Science News
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Phosphate sorption characteristics of European alpine soils

Date:
June 14, 2011
Source:
American Society of Agronomy
Summary:
Researchers have studied the impact alpine soil characteristics, specifically phosphate sorption, have on catchments of alpine lakes.
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FULL STORY

Research on phosphate sorption of alpine soils is limited, but European researchers have provided new data regarding the impact alpine soils have on catchments of alpine lakes.

Soil chemistry plays an important role in the composition of surface waters. In areas with limited human activities, properties of catchment soils directly relate to the exported nutrients to surface waters. Phosphate sorption research is common in agricultural and forest soils, but data from alpine areas are limited.

Scientists from the Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Repbublic, from the Centre for Advanced Studies of Blanes, and from the Forest Sciences Center of Catalonia, have conducted research of the impact European alpine soils have on numerous catchments of alpine lakes.

By comparing phosphate sorption characteristics of soils with different levels of acidification, the scientists determined which soil chemical properties affected phosphate sorption.

The study showed that the sorption of alpine soils from different localities were generally similar, ranging between 9 -- 145 mmol kg-1. This data was positively correlated with the sum of concentrations of aluminum and iron oxides.

Aluminum oxide concentration was the most important factor tested, accounting for an average of 67% of the sorption variability from the test sites.

Results also showed that similar concentrations of aluminum and iron oxides are able to more effectively retain phosphate in more acidic areas than in areas with high soil pH. Therefore, different levels of acidification of soils may contribute to lower phosphate concentrations in lakes in more acidified areas, compared to lakes less affected by acidification.

The complete results from this study can be found in the May-June 2011 issue of the Soil Science Society of America Journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Agronomy. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society of Agronomy. "Phosphate sorption characteristics of European alpine soils." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614131950.htm>.
American Society of Agronomy. (2011, June 14). Phosphate sorption characteristics of European alpine soils. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614131950.htm
American Society of Agronomy. "Phosphate sorption characteristics of European alpine soils." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614131950.htm (accessed May 23, 2015).

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