Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Shorter treatment with hepatitis C drug combination may be more beneficial, study shows

Date:
September 14, 2011
Source:
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center
Summary:
New research shows that patients with hepatitis C who took a combination medication -- a telaprevir-based regimen that is commonly used to treat the illness -- for 24 weeks were cured.

University of Cincinnati research published in the Sept. 14, 2011, advance online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine shows that patients with hepatitis C who took a combination medication -- a telaprevir-based regimen that is commonly used to treat the illness -- for 24 weeks were cured.

Related Articles


Usually, the treatment is administered for 48 weeks, and these results show that extended treatment is unnecessary, possibly changing the standard of care for hepatitis C patients. Researchers say this could mean better medication adherence as well as the decrease in side effects associated with longer medication use.

"Chronic infection with hepatitis C represents a serious health issue for nearly 200 million people worldwide," says Kenneth Sherman, MD, PhD, a UC Health digestive diseases expert, professor and chair of the division of digestive diseases at the UC College of Medicine and principal investigator of the study. "For many years, standard treatment of the type of hepatitis C most common in the United States required 48 weeks of treatment with two drugs: pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Sustained virologic response (cure) occurred in 40 to 50 percent of patients.

"In this clinical trial, we wanted to determine whether there was a group of patients that could be treated for a shorter period without sacrificing the response rate."

Hepatitis C is a viral disease that leads to inflammation of the liver. It can be spread through exchange of bodily fluids with an infected person.

In the study, 540 patients with hepatitis C who had not previously received treatment were enrolled. Seventy-two percent of all patients who entered the study had sustained viral response.

"The high viral cure rates showed that there was no benefit to extending the therapy to 48 weeks for the majority of people in this trial," Sherman says. "Importantly, patients in this trial had a high likelihood of achieving a cure with 24 weeks of total therapy if they had a rapid response to these regimens by week four. Knowing this may provide important motivation for people to continue therapy."

For this study, all patients received telaprevir -- a protease inhibitor for hepatitis C -- every eight hours, peginterferon alfa-2a every week and ribavirin daily for 12 weeks. Then, telaprevir was stopped, and patients received just peginterferon-ribavirin until week 20.

Patients who had an extended rapid virologic response (undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA levels in their blood at four and 12 weeks) were randomly assigned after the 20th week to receive the pegylated interferon and ribavirin for either four or 28 more weeks. Patients without an extended rapid virologic response, who still had detectable hepatitis C, were automatically assigned to an additional 28 weeks

A total of 352 -- 65 percent -- of patients in the study had an extended rapid virologic response.

Among the patients with an extended rapid virologic response who were randomly assigned to receive the combination, 92 percent in the 24-week group and 88 percent in the 48-week group had a sustained virologic response of hepatitis C infection.

"These results are likely to change treatment standards for patients with hepatitis C and reduce adverse effects of the treatment regimen," adds Sherman.

This study was funded by Vertex and Tibotec Pharmaceuticals. Sherman has served as an advisor to these companies for the past year.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kenneth E. Sherman, Steven L. Flamm, Nezam H. Afdhal, David R. Nelson, Mark S. Sulkowski, Gregory T. Everson, Michael W. Fried, Michael Adler, Hendrik W. Reesink, Marie Martin, Abdul J. Sankoh, Nathalie Adda, Robert S. Kauffman, Shelley George, Christopher I. Wright, Fred Poordad, for the ILLUMINATE Study Team. Response-Guided Telaprevir Combination Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection. New England Journal of Medicine, 2011; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1014463

Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Shorter treatment with hepatitis C drug combination may be more beneficial, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110914171748.htm>.
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. (2011, September 14). Shorter treatment with hepatitis C drug combination may be more beneficial, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110914171748.htm
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Shorter treatment with hepatitis C drug combination may be more beneficial, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110914171748.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins