Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite can provide better medicines

Date:
September 26, 2011
Source:
Nordic School of Public Health
Summary:
A recent article shows a link between changes in the malaria parasite and the absorption of pharmaceutical compounds. Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite and the connection with the development of resistance may contribute to the development of new malaria treatments.

Professor Max Petzold at the Nordic School of Public Health shows in a recent article a link between changes in the malaria parasite and the absorption of pharmaceutical compounds. Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite and the connection with the development of resistance may contribute to the development of new malaria treatments.

During the last decade, drug-resistant malaria parasites evolved in Southeast Asia. The most deadly malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has recently been shown to be resistant to the main component of malaria therapies (artemisinins). This is shown by Professor Max Petzold among others in the article "Novel polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum ABC Transporter Genes Are Associated with Major ACT Anti Mala Rial Drug Resistance." The study led to increased knowledge and awareness of the parasite's genes and their relationship with resistance.

The results may be important for how future therapies against malaria must be designed, says Max Petzold. About 40 percent of the worlds' population is exposed to malaria, which causes about one million deaths per year, mostly among children.

The study was initiated when signs of resistance in some areas of Cambodia had been seen. The resistance is believed to be caused by changes in three of the parsite's proteins.

The authors of the article reports that they have found previously unknown variations in the genes that control the proteins in the parasite. In addition, there is a connection between these variations and the parasite's susceptibility to malaria of processing elements (artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin, mefloquine or lumefantrine).The results will contribute to an increasing knowledge of the malaria parasite genes, which can be used in the development of future drugs against serious disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Nordic School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Maria Isabel Veiga, Pedro Eduardo Ferreira, Louise Jφrnhagen, Maja Malmberg, Aminatou Kone, Berit Aydin Schmidt, Max Petzold, Anders Bjφrkman, Francois Nosten, Jose Pedro Gil. Novel Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum ABC Transporter Genes Are Associated with Major ACT Antimalarial Drug Resistance. PLoS ONE, 2011; 6 (5): e20212 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020212

Cite This Page:

Nordic School of Public Health. "Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite can provide better medicines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081908.htm>.
Nordic School of Public Health. (2011, September 26). Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite can provide better medicines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081908.htm
Nordic School of Public Health. "Increased knowledge of the malaria parasite can provide better medicines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926081908.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) — President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins