Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Incidence of non-fatal pediatric firearm injuries in U.S. higher than previously estimated, study finds

Date:
October 17, 2011
Source:
American Academy of Pediatrics
Summary:
From 1999 to 2007, there were 185,950 emergency department visits in the U.S. for firearm injuries in children aged 0 to 19 years. A new study provides an overview of these injuries, including a variety of risk factors including age, race, hospital location, and insurance type.

From 1999 to 2007, there were 185,950 emergency department (ED) visits in the U.S. for firearm injuries in children aged 0 to 19 years. A new abstract presented Oct. 17 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Boston, provided an overview of these injuries, including a variety of risk factors including age, race, hospital location, and insurance type.

Researchers analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey of U.S. emergency department and ambulatory care visits and found that approximately 20,600 firearm injuries occur each year in children aged 0 to 19 years. Of these injuries, 4.5 percent, or 8,368 were fatal. Sixty- three percent of these injuries were intentional; 37 percent, or more than a third of these injuries, were unintentional.

Male children, adolescents aged 11 and older, and those of black race, were at higher risk for an ED visit secondary to a firearm injury.

Overall, the rate of non-fatal pediatric firearm injuries was 30 percent higher than previously reported according to lead study author Saranya Srinivasan, MD.

"This is a significant finding," said Srinivasan. "Perhaps we are underestimating the true scope of this problem."

In addition, "We know there are certain pediatric populations at higher risk for firearm injuries. We hope this research will bring attention to the issue of pediatric firearm injuries, and that we can continue to focus our efforts on firearm injury prevention campaigns, including targeting the regions and groups at the greatest risk for these injuries."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Pediatrics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Pediatrics. "Incidence of non-fatal pediatric firearm injuries in U.S. higher than previously estimated, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111017092229.htm>.
American Academy of Pediatrics. (2011, October 17). Incidence of non-fatal pediatric firearm injuries in U.S. higher than previously estimated, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111017092229.htm
American Academy of Pediatrics. "Incidence of non-fatal pediatric firearm injuries in U.S. higher than previously estimated, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111017092229.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins