Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bird stewards increase the effectiveness of protected beaches

Date:
February 20, 2012
Source:
Dick Jones Communications
Summary:
Bird stewards – individuals who police protected beaches and educate the public about the birds who inhabit it – greatly increase the effectiveness of protected beaches, a new survey finds.

Bird stewards -- individuals who police protected beaches and educate the public about the birds who inhabit it -- greatly increase the effectiveness of protected beaches, an Eckerd College survey finds.

Related Articles


"During 28 four-hour surveys, we observed nearly nine times more intruders into protected areas when there was no bird steward, compared to when a steward was present," says Beth Forys, professor of environmental science and biology at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, who completed the survey in a report to the National Fish & Wildlife Federation.

Human disturbance greatly disturbs migratory and overwintering shorebirds, such as the Red Knot, a robin-sized shorebird whose numbers have significantly declined in the past decade.

"While most Red Knots migrate from breeding grounds in the Arctic to wintering grounds at the tip of South America, a small portion of the population overwinters in Florida," Forys explains. "To make the trip to the Arctic to breed, Red Knots must have enough energy, and over-harvesting of their prey combined with disturbance may be impeding their ability to gain enough weight to make the long trip."

To better understand what management measures could help Red Knots in their Florida wintering grounds, Forys conducted the study to see if the endangered bird would be able to forage and rest more if a portion of the beach were protected.

Frequency and sources of disturbance to Red Knots were determined both for a year-round, symbolically-fenced, "protected area" on a county park beach and for three municipal beaches without fenced-off protected areas for shorebirds. Differences between rates of human-related disturbances per hour of observation within the fenced-off protected area versus the unprotected beaches were statistically significant.

Dr. Forys' field research then evaluated frequency of human intrusions into a fenced-off shorebird protection area with and without a bird steward present at the boundary of the protected area.

"A bird steward is an individual who wears a labeled, brightly colored vest and who educates the public about birds while asking them not to enter a protected area," she says. "If people entered the protected area, the bird steward would ask them to leave."

"While relatively few people entered the posted area, the presence of bird stewards effectively decreased that number," she says.

"This two-year project provides strong evidence for the importance of establishing symbolically-fenced beach areas attended by bird stewards that together minimize human intrusion and disturbance to shorebirds," Forys says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dick Jones Communications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dick Jones Communications. "Bird stewards increase the effectiveness of protected beaches." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120220102126.htm>.
Dick Jones Communications. (2012, February 20). Bird stewards increase the effectiveness of protected beaches. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120220102126.htm
Dick Jones Communications. "Bird stewards increase the effectiveness of protected beaches." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120220102126.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) — Thai wildlife officials begin a headcount of nearly 150 tigers kept by monks at a temple which has become the centre of a dispute over the welfare of the animals. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
College Kegger: University Gets in on Craft Brew

College Kegger: University Gets in on Craft Brew

AP (Apr. 24, 2015) — Theres never been a shortage of beer on college campuses. But students at Cal Poly-Pomona are learning how to brew, serving their product to classmates, and hoping to land jobs in craft breweries when they graduate. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cambodian Butterflies Help Villagers Make a Living

Cambodian Butterflies Help Villagers Make a Living

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) — Cambodia&apos;s Banteay Srey Butterfly Centre is the largest of its kind in Southeast Asia. As well as educating tourists about the creatures, it also offers a source of income to nearby villagers, who are paid to breed local species. Duration: 02:04 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

AP (Apr. 23, 2015) — Developers of 3D food printing hope the culinary technology will revolutionize the way we cook and eat. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins