Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists discover effects of PD-1 blockade on ART therapy in SIV-infected monkeys

Date:
March 8, 2012
Source:
Emory University
Summary:
Scientists have discovered that blocking PD-1, an immune molecule that inhibits the immune response to viral infections, can have a significant effect on HIV-like illness in non-human primates.

Scientists have discovered that blocking PD-1 (programmed death-1), an immune molecule that inhibits the immune response to viral infections, can have a significant effect on HIV-like illness in nonhuman primates.

In earlier research, the scientists showed that PD-1 blockade could restore T and B cell function against SIV. Now they have new findings about the effects of PD-1 blockade along with antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Vijayakumar Velu, PhD, a scientist at Yerkes National Primate Research Center and the Emory Vaccine Center presented the information at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle, Wash. Rama Rao Amara, PhD, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Yerkes and the Emory Vaccine Center, led the project.

The researchers treated SIV-infected rhesus macaque monkeys with ART from 16 to 21 weeks post infection then interrupted the therapy. The SIV viral load rapidly increased, along with the frequency of SIV-specific CD8 T cells. Four weeks later, the researchers treated some of the macaques with anti-PD-1 antibody and monitored both the treated and control animals.

Half the animals treated with PD-1 blockade, but only those with measurable CD8 T cells at the time of ART interruption, had a rapid decline in plasma viral load. PD-1 blockade did not enhance the frequency of SIV-specific CD8 T cells, but rather enhanced their function.

"Our results show PD-1 blockade after ART interruption can significantly enhance viral control, but the effect seems to depend on maintaining measurable SIV-specific CD8 T cell response following therapy," says Velu.

Rafi Ahmed, director of the Emory Vaccine Center and a key member of this research team, first identified the PD-1 molecule as a target for therapy designed to reactivate exhausted immune cells in chronic diseases. Other members of the research team are Gordon J. Freeman of Harvard Medical School and Kehmia Titanji, Ravi Dyavar Shetty and Hyun Woo Lee from Yerkes and the Emory Vaccine Center. The team plans to continue studying the interactive effects of PD-1 blockade combined with ART.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Emory University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Emory University. "Scientists discover effects of PD-1 blockade on ART therapy in SIV-infected monkeys." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120308174929.htm>.
Emory University. (2012, March 8). Scientists discover effects of PD-1 blockade on ART therapy in SIV-infected monkeys. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120308174929.htm
Emory University. "Scientists discover effects of PD-1 blockade on ART therapy in SIV-infected monkeys." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120308174929.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins