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Brightly colored bird bills indicate good health

Date:
May 24, 2012
Source:
Queen's University
Summary:
Female bill color reflects the health of the bird, a new study shows. Females with more colorful bills have higher antibody levels, indicating greater strength and the ability to fight off invaders.

A stork in its natural habitat. The colour of a female bird's bill has an important biological purpose, researchers say.
Credit: michaklootwijk / Fotolia

The colour of a female bird's bill has an important biological purpose, according to new Queen's research.

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Troy Murphy has found female bill colour reflects the health of the bird. Females with more colourful bills have higher antibody levels, indicating greater strength and the ability to fight off invaders.

"This is so exciting because it means a bird facing a rival with a colourful bill will be able to assess the rival's health and thus assess whether the rival will have lots of energy to invest in a fight," says Dr. Murphy, who conducted his research at the Queen's University Biological Station. "This information can then influence the decision to fight or flee -- and, if to flee, how fast it should flee."

The colour of a female bird's bill is strongly correlated with immunoglobulin antibodies, a component of the immune system in birds. Upon infection, these antibodies allow other immune cells to recognize the diseased cells and destroy them.

Dr. Murphy, who is currently an assistant professor (Biology) at Trinity University in Texas, also discovered there is no relation between immune capacity and male bill colour suggesting elaborately coloured bills have very sex-specific roles.

"Murphy's recent results add to a long tradition of bird behavioural ecology research at our biological station" says Station Director Stephen Lougheed. "Results like Dr. Murphy's clarify our understanding of how behaviour, colour and song are used in critical interactions among individuals, especially contests between members of the same sex and courtship between members of opposite sex."

The results of this research will be published in an upcoming issue of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queen's University. "Brightly colored bird bills indicate good health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 May 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120524134705.htm>.
Queen's University. (2012, May 24). Brightly colored bird bills indicate good health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120524134705.htm
Queen's University. "Brightly colored bird bills indicate good health." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120524134705.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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