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Fear can be erased from the brain, research shows

Date:
September 20, 2012
Source:
Uppsala University
Summary:
Newly formed emotional memories can be erased from the human brain, according to new research. The findings may represent a breakthrough in research on memory and fear.

Newly formed emotional memories can be erased from the human brain.
Credit: © alphaspirit / Fotolia

Newly formed emotional memories can be erased from the human brain. This is shown by researchers from Uppsala University in a new study now being published by the academic journal Science. The findings may represent a breakthrough in research on memory and fear.

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Thomas Εgren, a doctoral candidate at the Department of Psychology under the supervision of Professors Mats Fredrikson and Tomas Furmark, has shown, that it is possible to erase newly formed emotional memories from the human brain.

When a person learns something, a lasting long-term memory is created with the aid of a process of consolidation, which is based on the formation of proteins. When we remember something, the memory becomes unstable for a while and is then restabilized by another consolidation process. In other words, it can be said that we are not remembering what originally happened, but rather what we remembered the last time we thought about what happened. By disrupting the reconsolidation process that follows upon remembering, we can affect the content of memory.

In the study the researchers showed subjects a neutral picture and simultaneously administered an electric shock. In this way the picture came to elicit fear in the subjects which meant a fear memory had been formed. In order to activate this fear memory, the picture was then shown without any accompanying shock. For one experimental group the reconsolidation process was disrupted with the aid of repeated presentations of the picture. For a control group, the reconsolidation process was allowed to complete before the subjects were shown the same repeated presentations of the picture.

In that the experimental group was not allowed to reconsolidate the fear memory, the fear they previously associated with the picture dissipated. In other words, by disrupting the reconsolidation process, the memory was rendered neutral and no longer incited fear. At the same time, using a MR-scanner, the researchers were able to show that the traces of that memory also disappeared from the part of the brain that normally stores fearful memories, the nuclear group of amygdala in the temporal lobe.

'These findings may be a breakthrough in research on memory and fear. Ultimately the new findings may lead to improved treatment methods for the millions of people in the world who suffer from anxiety issues like phobias, post-traumatic stress, and panic attacks,' says Thomas Εgren.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Uppsala University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. Agren, J. Engman, A. Frick, J. Bjorkstrand, E.-M. Larsson, T. Furmark, M. Fredrikson. Disruption of Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala. Science, 2012; 337 (6101): 1550 DOI: 10.1126/science.1223006

Cite This Page:

Uppsala University. "Fear can be erased from the brain, research shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120920141155.htm>.
Uppsala University. (2012, September 20). Fear can be erased from the brain, research shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120920141155.htm
Uppsala University. "Fear can be erased from the brain, research shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120920141155.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

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