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How food marketers can help consumers eat better while improving their bottom line

Date:
October 11, 2012
Source:
Cornell Food & Brand Lab
Summary:
Food marketers are masters at getting people to crave and consume the foods they promote. Researchers now challenge the popular assumptions linking food marketing and obesity. New research suggests that consumption of healthy and unhealthy food responds to the same marketing tactics, presenting food marketers with a "win-win" situation in which they can turn the tables, compel consumers to eat healthier foods, and maintain profitability.

Food marketers are masters at getting people to crave and consume the foods that they promote. In this study authors Dr. Brian Wansink, co-director of the Cornell University Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition and Professor of Marketing and Dr. Pierre Chandon, professor of Marketing at the leading French graduate school of business, INSEAD challenge popular assumptions that link food marketing and obesity.

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Their findings presented last weekend at the Association for Consumer Research Conference in Vancouver, Canada point to ways in which smart food marketers can use the techniques that peak consumer appetite for calorie-dense fast foods to help people eat better -- and improve their bottom line as well.

"People generally want food that tastes good while being affordable, varied, convenient and healthy -- roughly in that order. Our research suggests that consumption of healthy and unhealthy food respond to the same marketing tactics, particularly price reduction. In this study we present food marketers with a 'win-win' situation in which they can turn the tables, compel consumers to eat healthier foods, and maintain profitability. For example, marketers can steer consumers away from high-calorie sugary drinks by offering meal discounts if a person buys a diet drink -- or by offering a healthy habit loyalty card when consumers opt for milk, juice or water instead of sugary drinks. "When all sides win, no one resists," Wansink said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell Food & Brand Lab. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Pierre Chandon, Brian Wansink. Does food marketing need to make us fat? A review and solutions. Nutrition Reviews, 2012; 70 (10): 571 DOI: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00518.x

Cite This Page:

Cornell Food & Brand Lab. "How food marketers can help consumers eat better while improving their bottom line." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121011090651.htm>.
Cornell Food & Brand Lab. (2012, October 11). How food marketers can help consumers eat better while improving their bottom line. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121011090651.htm
Cornell Food & Brand Lab. "How food marketers can help consumers eat better while improving their bottom line." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121011090651.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

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