Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Smaller radiation fields can spare brain when treating tumors, research finds

Date:
January 9, 2013
Source:
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
New research shows that patients suffering from aggressive brain tumors can be effectively treated with smaller radiation fields to spare the rest of the brain and preserve cognition.

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center shows that patients suffering from aggressive brain tumors can be effectively treated with smaller radiation fields to spare the rest of the brain and preserve cognition.

"For patients with glioblastoma, we now know we can safely and effectively treat them with smaller radiation fields to spare the rest of their normal brain," said lead investigator Michael D. Chan, M.D., assistant professor of radiation oncology at Wake Forest Baptist. "That's important because it lessens the symptoms from radiation toxicity like tiredness and nausea."

Chan said that a patient's cognition is related to how much normal brain is irradiated so focusing radiation on smaller areas of the brain may help preserve cognition and does not seem to lead to an increase in the likelihood of the tumor recurring. Overall, while long-term survival rates for glioblastoma multiforme patients have not improved by much with treatment advances, the ability to treat with smaller radiation fields preserves cognition and provides the possibility of better quality of life.

Recent research findings from Chan and colleagues appeared online last month ahead of print in the American Journal of Clinical Oncology. While there have been other similar studies, this one is the largest to compare smaller radiation margins to larger ones to document differences in patterns of failure for patients, Chan said. For this retrospective study, records for 161 patients treated at Wake Forest Baptist over the last 10 years were reviewed.

"We decided a few years ago that it would be worthwhile to look at whether using these tighter margins would affect the tumors coming back outside of the radiation field, or tell us if we are barely missing," Chan said. "We are the first to show definitively that people with smaller margins don't do any worse than those with larger margins."

Chan said that in the 1990s, Wake Forest Baptist's Edward G. Shaw, M.D., professor of radiation oncology, was part of a group that pioneered using smaller margins because it was less toxic. Smaller radiation margins around the tumor do not seem to lead to an increase in the tumor returning just outside of the radiation field, Chan said. A smaller radiation field, combined with modern treatment techniques, like newer chemotherapy agents and radiation technologies, provides physicians with more options.

"Treatments have gotten better over time and people with GBM may live longer than they had in the past. Our study found that the margins did not affect where the GBM came back or how long it took it to come back and it did not affect the overall survival," Chan said. "This could potentially be practice changing."

Co-authors include: Anna K. Paulsson, B.S., Kevin P. McMullen, M.D., Ann M. Pfeiffer, Ph.D., William H. Hinson, PhD., William T. Kearns, M.S., Annette J. Johnson, M.D., M.S., Glenn J. Lesser, M.D., Thomas L. Ellis, M.D., Stephen B. Tatter, M.D., Ph.D., Waldemar Debinski, M.D., Ph.D., and Edward G. Shaw, M.D., M.A., all of Wake Forest Baptist.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Anna K. Paulsson, Kevin P. McMullen, Ann M. Peiffer, William H. Hinson, William T. Kearns, Annette J. Johnson, Glenn J. Lesser, Thomas L. Ellis, Stephen B. Tatter, Waldemar Debinski, Edward G. Shaw, Michael D. Chan. Limited Margins Using Modern Radiotherapy Techniques Does Not Increase Marginal Failure Rate of Glioblastoma. American Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2012; DOI: 10.1097/COC.0b013e318271ae03

Cite This Page:

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. "Smaller radiation fields can spare brain when treating tumors, research finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130109124231.htm>.
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. (2013, January 9). Smaller radiation fields can spare brain when treating tumors, research finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130109124231.htm
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. "Smaller radiation fields can spare brain when treating tumors, research finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130109124231.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins