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Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment

Date:
January 28, 2013
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Cardiac disease is associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment such as problems with language, thinking and judgment -- particularly among women with heart disease, a new study shows.

Cardiac disease is associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment such as problems with language, thinking and judgment -- particularly among women with heart disease, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Known as nonamnestic because it doesn't include memory loss, this type of mild cognitive impairment may be a precursor to vascular and other non-Alzheimer's dementias, according to the findings published online in JAMA Neurology.

Mild cognitive impairment is an important stage for early detection and intervention in dementia, says lead author, Rosebud Roberts, M.B., Ch.B., a health sciences researcher at Mayo Clinic.

"Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors are likely to reduce the risk," Roberts says.

Researchers evaluated 2,719 people ages 70 to 89 at the beginning of the study and every 15 months after. Of the 1,450 without mild cognitive impairment at the beginning, 669 had heart disease and 59 (8.8 percent) developed nonamenestic mild cognitive impairment; in comparison 34 (4.4 percent) of 781 who did not have heart disease developed nonamenestic mild cognitive impairment.

The association varied by sex; cardiac disease and mild cognitive impairment appeared together more often among women than in men.

This research was funded by National Institutes of Health grant AG006786 and the Robert H. and Clarice Smith and Abigail van Buren Alzheimer's Disease Research Program and was made possible by the NIH-funded Rochester Epidemiology Project.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rosebud O. Roberts et al. Cardiac Disease Associated With Increased Risk of Nonamnestic Cognitive ImpairmentStronger Effect on Women. JAMA Neurology, 2013 DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.607

Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128163334.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2013, January 28). Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128163334.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128163334.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

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