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Despite reported dislike, older readers put in less effort when using e-readers

Date:
February 6, 2013
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Reading text on digital devices like tablet computers requires less effort from older adults than reading on paper.

When asked, both young and old adults stated a strong preference for paper books, but when they compared eye movements and brain activity measures, older adults fared better with backlit digital readers like tablet computers.
Credit: © Paolese / Fotolia

Reading text on digital devices like tablet computers requires less effort from older adults than reading on paper, according to research published February 6 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Matthias Schlesewsky and colleagues from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from Georg August University Gφttingen and the University of Marburg, Germany.

In the past, surveys have shown that people prefer to read paper books rather than on e-readers or tablet computers. Here, the authors evaluated the origins of this preference in terms of the neural effort required to process information read on these three different media. They found that when asked, both young and old adults stated a strong preference for paper books, but when they compared eye movements and brain activity measures, older adults fared better with backlit digital readers like tablet computers.

The authors measured two parameters in the readers: time required for visual fixation, and EEG measures of brain activity with the different reading devices to identify the amount of cognitive processing required for each device.

The researchers found that younger readers between the ages of 21 and 34 showed similar eye movements and EEG measures of brain activity across the three reading devices. Older adults aged 60-77 years spent less time fixating the text and showed lower brain activity when using a tablet computer, as compared to the other media. The study concludes that this effect is likely due to better text discrimination on the backlit displays. None of the participants in the study had trouble comprehending what they had read on any of the devices, but based on the physiological measures assessed, the researchers suggest that older readers may benefit from the enhanced contrast on electronic reading devices.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Franziska Kretzschmar, Dominique Pleimling, Jana Hosemann, Stephan Fόssel, Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Matthias Schlesewsky. Subjective Impressions Do Not Mirror Online Reading Effort: Concurrent EEG-Eyetracking Evidence from the Reading of Books and Digital Media. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (2): e56178 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056178

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Despite reported dislike, older readers put in less effort when using e-readers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206185839.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2013, February 6). Despite reported dislike, older readers put in less effort when using e-readers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206185839.htm
Public Library of Science. "Despite reported dislike, older readers put in less effort when using e-readers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206185839.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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